Author Topic: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out  (Read 5691 times)

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Offline LR1

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Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« on: August 07, 2009, 02:21:44 AM »
All members who want to help please add what you think is missing from this list please do so.

Disclaimer: ONLY use the following items if you know how to use them. If you do not know HOW to use them ask someone that has the knowledge to show you. Some equipment listed can be dangerous and even life threatening. You must use the equipment at your own discretion. ICLICK Off-road can not and is not responsible for the in-operation of any trail equipment suggested.

Always tell someone where you are heading!! Nothing worse than trying to find someone that didn't tell anyone where they were going.

This is a recommendation list. Things all wheelers should have... Sometimes we just can't afford it and that is understandable!

-Tow Strap/ bounce rope           -First Aid Kit
-Clevises                                  -spare nuts and bolts
-Something to lay on(if your spoiled of course)
-Squeegy (spelling? LOL)             -Blanket (For those long cold lonely nights stuck in the mud)
- Fire Starter (read the directions before use)
-Flash light or two just in case you cheeped out on one
-Proper size spare tire             -Tool Kit including sockets, wrenches, lock tight, Hammer
-Tire Repair Kit                         -Heat temp tape for radiator hoses
-Shovel                                    -Air Compressor or hand pump                  
-Tire Iron and Jack (Jack must be able to lift the vehicle high enough)
-Water                                     -Come Along (hand winch)
-GPS is always handy, or if your old school a compass and map
-Litre of oil                              -Spare Clothing
-Toilette paper (you just never know)
-FIRE EXTINGISHER                 - Pack a little extra grub
-Litre of diff fluid                      -Spare belts (just keep the old ones when you change em)
-Duck Tape                              -Spare set of wheel bearings with their races
-Axe or Chain Saw                     -Grease for those wheel bearing
-U Joints                                 - A friend with another truck
-Break line (that fits)                -Break fluid
-Tie straps                                -JB Weld
-Siphon hose                           -Knife
-Snatch block or two                 -Propane torch
-Silicon                                    -Jumper cables
-Jug of water                            -Chains
-Fuses                                     -valve cores
-Base for Jackal                      -Flares (only use if you know how to)
   Example: steel plate, old wheel

-Some sort of technology that can be used to get a hold of emergency services in a worst case scenario ie. SPOT

Winter wheeling Add

Winter boots, snowpants, gloves, touque, and a heavy winter jacket

Everyone that suggests useful stuff will get some free Karma.. Yippy eh... well one day I will let you know when your Karma is like cash. But no one is near it yet.

« Last Edit: March 30, 2010, 08:19:25 AM by Lego »
Yes I did it again...

Offline Bones

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #1 on: August 12, 2009, 05:32:16 AM »
lol i forgot many times but an air compressor or even a hand pump for emergency. and just in case your tire falls off bead some starting fluid and a lighter. . .

That's a good one, carry a pump of some sort capable of airing up tires, but on to that last part, it can also be a dangerous one, does any one know how much fluid is enough or too much........KABOOM!

I like to try and keep my fingers and limbs in tact while out wheeling so I would recommend a revision on the second part of this one....Take a good ratchet strap ( nylon ones don't work very well for this so a good material one is better) or chain and wrap it centered on the tread around the diameter of the tire and secure it tight, now slide a flex bar or pipe W.H.Y in between the tire and strap and start to wind the strap/chain around the bar, as you do this the tire tread will be compressed in the center which in turn forces the tire bead outwards sealing it for air containment, as soon as your bead is set with some air pressure, take off the strap/chain and fill the tire to the desired pressure with that pump you remembered to throw in the rig before you left.

The flex bar/flex handle you already carry with your trail tools and ratchet straps and chains are always in your wheeler too right?



I used to carry all sorts of tools, but soon realized that I never used 3/4's of what I had in my rig for tools, this unnecessary weight could contribute to an over laden rig, poor fuel consumption and bad handling. All that extra weight can't be good on the drive-train and down through the diffs while pounding down the trails.

Now for the most part my trail tool bag consists of only tools I need to take apart and fix my rig, I don't carry those 4 full sets of impact sockets now I just carry the 4 deep impact sockets and 6 short impact sockets my rig uses as well as I don't carry that bag of 15-20 assorted wrenches either, I just take the 4 wrenches my rig needs and so on, the weight savings can be substantial depending on what you normally carry, like that 100lbs worth of  tools your rig has in the back can turn into a 25-30 lbs tool bag of essential tools instead.

That kinda goes with the spare part theory too, try and just bring what may break, like ujoints, belts, you know the parts you end up needing, don't bring spares like drop outs or springs or any of those heavy parts you likely won't ever need. On the other hand if your rig has had starter or alternator trouble on occasion, maybe bringing a spare starter/alt would be a good idea.


See when I start typing I seem to drift into another reality where I just type and type and there's no telling when the info will stop flooding out of my head. Now that I rambled on forever.

First: GET OFF SPACEBOOK or MYFACE.
Second: have a drink and calm down
Third: Bust a nut with one of her friends

If it weren't for the gutter, my mind would be homeless.

silicone is a good thing, it makes computers faster, windows waterproof,flat asses round & saggy tits stand up
 
Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Bones

Offline LR1

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2010, 08:19:56 AM »
Thanks for the suggestions. I have updated the list cheers
Yes I did it again...

YJWralph

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2010, 11:27:31 AM »
Holy Sh$t, Lego!  I'm just in a YJ!  So where the hell would I fit in there??? (poke, poke)

stickerboy111

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2010, 03:28:17 PM »
Garbage bag or Burlap sack for cleaning up the trails as we go wheeling. 

Offline 2yb3

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2011, 10:14:38 AM »
I want to say wire(survival/trapper wire) and some vice grips and clamps. Grandpa was telling me of this one time when he was up north near tatooga lake visiting his trapper friend on the dease lake rail line, and they were wheeling in his nissan, crossing this one creek (trapper named it son of a bi*** creek lol) when the motor broke a motor mount, so terry had some trappin wire on him used that, a tensioner and some vice grips and that got them back.

moose_hunter

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2011, 11:22:56 AM »
im going to add wd 40 or some sort of lubricant (that stuff always comes in handy) and possible a machete, not only can you use it for getting fire wood but you can use it for clearing out old trails or chopping branches or trees, the machete is just so much more versatile then an axe

Offline 2yb3

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2011, 11:48:57 AM »
im going to add wd 40 or some sort of lubricant (that stuff always comes in handy) and possible a machete, not only can you use it for getting fire wood but you can use it for clearing out old trails or chopping branches or trees, the machete is just so much more versatile then an axe

yeah and if we ever come across any mexican drug cartel we have the weapon of choice lol. Spark plugs id add to the list too

moose_hunter

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #8 on: March 21, 2011, 12:06:05 PM »
ya never know where them mexicans will be

moose_hunter

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2011, 05:55:33 AM »
id say wd 40 for sure though it can be an emergency combustant and also good for cleaning things and getting off stubborn bolts when bones breaks a u joint #fawker

Silent Swamper

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2011, 07:26:55 AM »
The most important thing you can bring is a good attitude! #dance


And maybe a polaski - then you can chop up the mexicans and bury them too!  One tool - so many uses.... cheers
« Last Edit: March 24, 2011, 07:28:03 AM by Silent Swamper »

moose_hunter

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2011, 07:27:19 AM »
 #rockon

YJWralph

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2011, 03:22:22 PM »
The most important thing you can bring is a good attitude! #dance


And maybe a polaski - then you can chop up the mexicans and bury them too!  One tool - so many uses.... cheers
Buddy of mine packs a polaski...  Very useful tool!   cheers

Offline ruff19

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2011, 02:48:04 AM »
more to add



Offroad Checklist


Offroaders Guide to Gearing up for Offroad

    The Basic List
    Safety and Survival
    Beyond the Basic Offroad Checklist
    Vehicle Recovery Items
    Tools Checklist
    Versatile Items
    For the Vehicle
    For the Serious Offroader
    Basic Camping / Extended Stay List
    25 Tips to do before going Offroad


Basic Tips

    Always travel in groups of 2 or more vehicles
    Always alert someone back home where you are going and when you expect to return
    Take at least a basic supply of tools and gear

Pre-departure Maintenance Checklist

    Check engine oil
    Check transmission oil
    Check brake fluid
    Check radiator coolant for leaks, fluid levels, clean fins, thermostat and radiator cap
    Check battery for damaged or corroded wiring, clean terminals
    Check windshield wipers for wear and fluid level
    Check fan belts for cracks
    Check hoses for cracks and bulges
    Check air cleaner
    Check seat belts
    Check tire air pressure (air up to recommended pressure for highway driving, air down at trail head, air up prior to trip home)
    Check tires tread wear or damage (including your full-size spare), look for cuts and missing chunks
    Check and tighten lug bolts
    Tighten drive shaft u-bolts
    Check and tighten lug bolts
    Check for body/frame cracks
    Check brake pads & shoes (adequate braking pad material, in good condition and without contamination)
    Check for loose bolts or nuts throughout vehicle (loose nuts will lead to shearing the studs off)
    Grease all fittings (u-joints, steering)
    Check gear oils: transfer case/differentials, replace if necessary
    Check Winch for proper operation, check winch cable for kinks, frays or damage, straighten winch cable if necessary
    Check headlights, brake lights, auxiliary lights; make sure they're aimed properly
    Check suspension including springs, shocks, alignment, wheel bearings and steering linkage


The Basic, Minimal Offroad Checklist

The minimal list is the basics that you should always carry in your vehicle when offroad. These items are good to have in the vehicle at all times.

    First Aid Kit (See Safety and Survival below)
    Basic Personal Essentials (water, food)
    Spare Tire, Full Size
    Jack and tire iron to change your tire
    Tow strap
    Tree saver
    Come-alongs
    Basic Tool Kit
    Spare Key for vehicle kept on your person

Safety and Survival

    The First Aid Kit
        First aid kits come in many shapes and sizes. You can buy them, or you can make your own kit. Whether you buy a first aid kit or put one together, make sure it has all the items you may need. Include any personal items, such as medications. Keep ID card (and/or copies), emergency number contact info and medication allergy in your purse, in your vehicle glove box, and in your first aid kit.

Here are suggestions for the contents of a first aid kit:

    Activated Charcoal (use only if instructed by Poison Control Center)
    Adhesive Tape
    Antiseptic Ointment
    Alcohol swabs, individually wrapped
    Band-Aids (assorted sizes)
    Blanket
    Cold Pack
    Disposable Gloves
    Gauze Pads and Roller Gauze (assorted sizes)
    Hand Cleaner
    Plastic Bags
    Scissors and Tweezers
    Small Flashlight and Extra Batteries
    Syrup of Ipecac (use only if instructed by Poison Control Center)
    Triangular Bandage
    Burnaid gel
    Snake Bite kit
    Disposable emergency blanket
    Instant Cold pack
    Instant Hot pack
    Medications:
    IMPORTANT: LOOK AT THE EXPIRATION DATE ON ALL MEDICATION PACKAGES! DO NOT USE ANY MEDICATIONS AFTER THEY EXPIRE. ALSO TEMPERATURE CHANGES AND HUMIDITY CAN CAUSE MEDICATION TO BECOME INEFFECTICE OR DANGEROUS. Anti-diarrhea medication, Tylenol ( fever reducer), Ibuprofen (Nuprin, Motrin, Advil) inflammation reduction, sprains bruises, etc, Benadryl for mild allergic reactions, Epinephrine in the form of an Epi Pen to treat more serious allergic reactions that might otherwise be fatal.

Safety Items

    Safety Glasses
    Leather Gloves
    Fire Extinguisher - Should be mounted in the vehicle in an easily accessible location.
    Flares
    Tarp
    Flashlights
    Matches / lighter

Basic Personal Essentials

    Water - At least 1 Gallon per person, per day if not more. Drier, hotter climates require at least 2 Gallons, per day if not more. Remember: Alcohol doesn't hydrate. In fact alcoholic beverages dehydrate since it take more water to metabolize alcohol than the beverage contains. Plus it may cause you to require the above mentioned First Aid Kit.
    Food - Bring food for twice the amount of time you are planning on being gone. Should you be delayed and have to spend a night out on the trail, you wont have to worry about going hungry. Good ideas for trail food: trail mix, snacks, beef jerky, fruits, dry/canned food, etc.
    Extra Cloths - Nobody likes to sit in wet cloths or an extended period of time.
    Personal items - This includes toilet paper, anti- microbial hand cleaner, etc
    Sun block
    Rain Jacket
    Communication devices - Cell Phone, CB Radio, Amature (Ham) Radio (license required to operate), GMRS/FRS radios
    Power inverter if necessary (e.g. Cell phone recharger, battery recharger for communication devices and camera)
    Trash bags - Keep your trails clean
    Maps, information about the area
    Compass or GPS
    Water purification tablets

Survival - Seasonal Specific

    Winter
        Extra clothing
        Warm outer layers (jacket, wind breaker)
        Head gear (warm hat, hooded jacket)
        Emergency blanket (compact survival type)

    Summer
        Sun Block
        Insect repellant
        Sunglasses


Beyond the Basic Offroad Checklist

Vehicle Recovery Items

    Hilift Jack
    Tow straps - 2 or more, 2 inch width or wider, 20 foot or longer
    Towpoints front and rear, frame mounted
    Tree saver
    Come-along (one or more)
    D-rings, Shackles
    Shovel (standard or military foldup)
    Axe (at least hand axe or hatchet)
    Chainsaw and bar oil, 2 cycle engine oil, spare chain (can be handy in recover situations, as well as for trail clearing on wooded trails)
    Winch Kit: tree strap, hi-lift jack, snatch block, pickle fork, shackle, gloves
    Pullpal
    Snow tire chains (if tires don't cut it)

Basic Tools

    Complete Socket Set with SAE (standard) and Metric with 3/8" and 1/2" drives. Deep and standard sockets.
    Crescent, open end combination box wrenches SAE (standard) and Metric
    Allen Wrenches
    Torx sockets (especially if you own a Jeep)
    Standard & Phillips screwdrivers, large, medium, small

Versatile Tools

    Large Hammer (a.k.a. the "BFH")
    Pliers (various sizes)
    Needle Nose Pliers
    Vice Grips, various sizes
    Large channel-lock Pliers
    Pipe wrenches - having 2 medium of these can be useful for tie-rods.
    Pocket/utility knife or razor blades
    Crescent wrenches (medium & large)
    Hacksaw with spare blade
    A BIG pry bar (or crowbar) or length of strong metal pipe, inside diameter of pipe large enough to slip over a wrench or socket drive for extra leverage.
    Magnet

Specialty Tools

    Snap ring pliers
    Air Pressure Gauge
    Portable air pump
    Standard Bottle Jack with 12" square wooden platform for use in soft ground
    12 volt and battery powered portable tools: Impact wrench, sawzall, drill, spotlight
    Jumper cables

Additional Versatile Items

    Duct Tape
    Bailing wire
    Wood blocks - Useful as chock blocks, jacking platforms, ramps, suspension supports (for broken torsion bars)
    Hose clamps
    Bungee cords, several in multiple sizes - good for securing gear, temporary repairs, etc.
    Small ratchet straps
    Rope lengths
    Super glue/epoxy
    Tank sealant putty
    Tie wraps
    Rags
    Work Gloves, leather

For the Vehicle

Fluids

    Engine Oil
    Brake Fluid
    Power steering fluid
    Automatic transmission fluid
    Coolant or Water
    Bearing Grease
    WD-40
    JB Weld
    Starter Fluid
    Extra gas
    Funnel, siphon hose

Spare Parts / Repair Items

    Lug Wrench
    Extra Fan / serpentine belts
    Hoses, fuel line, brake lines, coolant hoses, hydraulic hoses or plugs (if using a ram assist or full hydro)
    Spare Fuel filter (if not using a cleanable one)
    Spare Hi-steer studs (if applicable)
    Spare Tire
    Fix-A-Flat and/or Tire Plug kit, plugs
    Extra Lug nuts, tire star wrench or lug key with key socket
    Cotter pins / keys - various sizes
    Valve stems, Valve stem remover
    Nuts & bolts assorted standard and metric sizes
    Spare Leaf spring center bolts
    RTV or Hylomar HPF - form-a-gasket
    Radiator stop leak - silver flakes in tube
    Spare Hub (and hub fuses if applicable).
    Electric fuel pump
    Coil / electronic ignition
    Spare Universal Joints (U-joints for drive shaft & axles)
    Spare Drive Shaft (rear and front)
    Extra spark plug wire (size of longest wire)
    Spare points

Electronics Repair Kit

    Volt ohms meter (multimeter)
    Wire cutters / wire crips / wire strippers (multi-tool)
    Spare fuses of all sizes and types used in your vehicle
    Electrical tape
    Spare wire - lengths of various gauges
    Spare switches
    Spare relay if you use relays
    Spare vehicle sensors - TPS, MAP, etc.
    Crip on ends (male and female, various gauges)
    Small pocket sized needle point blow torch (handy for soldering wire)
    Flux core solder for repairs
    Wiring Diagram of your vehicle

Expanded List

    Winch and Winch Accessories
    Onboard Welder, welding supplies, welding gear and misc. metal pieces (for making repairs especially if carrying an on-board welder)
    Onboard air compressor such as ARB or QuickAir
    Externally mounted Jerry Can for fuel
    Spare axles (rear left / right, front left / right)
    Spare tie rod assemblies (tie rod, drag link, ball joints, ball joint nuts and cotter pins)
    Spare Idler Arm
    Parts that have broken twice before (if you can't carry it, you should have upgraded it)

Camping List for Extended Stay or Remote Excursions

    Maps, information about the area
    Camera and/or Camcorder
    Compass and/or GPS
    Hiking boots or comfortable walking shoes (if you are not already wearing them)
    Duct Tape
    Flashlight
    Propane Lanterns
    Mosquito repellant
    Lighter, matches
    Firewood
    A knife of some sort
    Toilet paper
    Towel
    Water purification pills
    Backpack/sacks
    Cooking Pans for breakfast
    Paper plates
    Paper towels
    Folding camping chairs
    Sleeping bag
    Sleeping pad or air mattress
    Stove or grill and fuel
    Tarps, lots of tarps
    Tent(s)
    Bathing suit
    Flip flops or swimming shoes (no bare feet while swimming)
    Funky fishing hat
    Hiking boots
    Rain jacket
    Sunglasses
    Sunblock
    Soap - Antibacterial
    Waterless hand scrub and/or Wet Wipes
    Binoculars
    Bottle opener
    Cooler cup
    Jacket
    Pocket knife
    Snacks
    Trash bag
    Water
    Extra keys
    Compass
    Sunscreen
    Hat
    Sunglasses and/or goggles
    Ice and ice chest or cooler with beverages and food (cooler with latching top and handles to use as strap point)
    Camera, case, film and batteries
    Maps: Sidekick Off Road Maps, state, county, Forestry, BLM Desert Access Guide, etc

taken from here :
http://www.explorerforum.com/forums/showthread.php?t=199994
how u got there is not the point, did u have fun on the way !

BleepinJeep

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Re: Suggested Trail Equipment Before heading out
« Reply #14 on: April 05, 2012, 06:41:15 AM »
Extra consumables ie beer, cigarettes and water
Oh and dont forget the sacrificial virgin